SURVIVAL IS INSUFFICIENT ZOOM THEATER READING SERIES TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6 AT 7PM/ET

The live 10-play series from the award-winning international production company Ego Actus will run Tuesdays at 7PM/ET through December. There will be no performance on Election Day, November 3.

Gary Morgenstein’s drama Saving Stan, a love story about passion friendship and suicide, will kick off the new Survival is Insufficient Zoom Theater reading series on Tuesday, October 6 at 7PM.

In Saving Stan, Stan Nagel, a rich 60ish lawyer, suffers a stroke and can’t talk. His best friend Jack Sanders, a 60ish failed writer, somehow hears him and believes Stan is asking for help to commit suicide in exchange for getting his estate. The third character, 40-something lonely Patrice Doner, the live-in health care aide, grows suspicious of Jack’s intentions while falling in love with Stan, with whom only she can dance. Who will Save Stan?

To RSVP, please go to https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUlcOytqD0iGtDFHi4nuiTRa5VkL-nVavzG

Directed by Joan Kane, the play stars Frances McGarry* as Patrice Doner, Carlo Fiorletta* as Stan Nagel and J. Dolan Byrnes* as Jack Sanders.

Gary Morgenstein (playwright) is the author of the funny new drama about racial harmony, A Black and White Cookie, directed by Joan Kane and produced by Ego Actus, which is scheduled to open at the Theater for the New City post-lockdown. His other works include A Tomato Can’t Grow in the Bronx about a 1960s Bronx Jewish family’s search for the American Dream. Morgenstein is the author of six novels including the critically acclaimed dystopian sci-fi baseball book A Mound Over Hell, which has been hailed as “1984 Meets Shoeless Joe.” His new novel A Fastball for Freedom will be published in 2021. https://www.bhcpress.com/Books_Morgenstein_A_Mound_Over_Hell.html

Joan Kane (director) is the founding Artistic Director of Ego Actus and directed Sycorax at HERE, Play Nice! at 59e59 theaters, I Know What Boys Want at Theatre Row, Six Characters in Search of an Author in Oslo, Norway and Kafka’s Belinda in Prague. She also directed both Safe and what do you mean at 59e59 theaters and in the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. Joan was named Best Director in the 2016 United Solo Festival and is in the nytheatre.com Indie Theatre Hall of Fame. Joan has an MFA in Directing and MS in Museum Education. She is a member of NY Madness, the Dramatists Guild, Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers and New York Women in Film and Television. Please see www.EgoActus.com and JoanKane.us

Frances McGarry* (Patrice Doner) Ph.D. is an actor, arts advocate activist, theatre educator and podcast host of First Online With Fran featuring ordinary people doing extraordinary things in the arts. She recently performed in a Zoom staged reading of A Tomato Can’t Grow in the Bronx by Gary Morgenstein and was cast in a Hallmark TV movie that airs Christmas 2020. Member of LPTW & NYWIFT. Represented by BMG. Please see her sites www.FirstOnlineWithFran.com and www.FrancesMcGarry.com

Carlo Fiorletta * (Stan Nagel) is a Queens College CUNY graduate. Stage: Robert in Proof, Sal in Those the River Keeps, Kaplan in Bogosity.  Film: Detours an Action on Film Festival best film and Surviving Family both are on Amazon Prime and Tubi. TV: Multiple dramas and histories. Carlo is the President of GIAA and married to Mara Lesemann.

J. Dolan Byrnes* (Jack Sanders) is a New York based actor.  Recent credits: Charles Peters in Don’t Stand Up! streaming soon at the Hartford Fringe Festival, Harry Truman in Give ‘Em Hell Harry, Mark in Melting the ICE, and Nikolai in The Long Way Home.  He is two-time recipient of the Outstanding Actor Award from Planet Connections Theatre Festivity for his roles in what do you mean and When The Party’s Over. Dolan is a member of Articulate Theatre Company. 

Stark Wilz (stage directions reader) is a musician and singer/songwriter, as well as actor, poet and writer in New York City who hails from the Midwest and spent his youth acquiring culture and education in America and Europe. His music and political musings are widely available on iTunes, Spotify and Amazon, as well as a host of other platforms.

Ego Actus (production company) is Latin for “My Way.” Joan Kane and Bruce A! Kraemer created an independent theatre in company in 2009 dedicated to doing art for art’s sake. Joan directs, Bruce designs, and we both produce. We have done shows at 59e59 Theaters, Theatre Row, HERE, Theater for a New City, Urban Stages and in Edinburgh and Prague. We are affiliated with the League of Independent Theater and Fractured Atlas. We consider this series to be our 50th production. Please see http://egoactus.com/plays/survival-is-insufficient/

*appears courtesy of Actor’s Equity

To RSVP, please go to https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUlcOytqD0iGtDFHi4nuiTRa5VkL-nVavzG

For further information please contact: BruLight@aol.com

Theatre Pizazz Kickoff Promotion

All About Image/We Are The Elite

Marcina Zaccaria’s All About Image/We Are The Elite

Directed by Tony Tambasco

A drama written in the present time, taking place in New York City and other parts of the U.S., All About Image/ We are the Elite is a journey of the people who make images. In the process of capturing and making these images, the characters explore their personal relationships while re-affirming their aesthetic principles.

What they see is under critique. What they present is a complete outpouring of their entire vision.

Photos courtesy Steven Pisano

Tickets available through Eventbrite

Part of the New York International Fringe Festival

Kraine Theater

85 East 4th Street

New York, NY 10003

View Map

October 3 @ 7:00pm

October 4 @ 7:00pm

October 5 @ 5:15pm

October 6 @ 5:30pm    

Featuring:

David Arthur Bachrach *

J. Dolan Byrnes *

Frances McGarry *

Jeff Burchfield *

Don Carter *

Catherine Luciani

Milton Lyles II

Nana Ponceleon

Akin Salawu

Lourdes Severny

Kelsey Shapira Katy Wilson
* Appears courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association


Further details at Fringe BYOV.

For a Good Time Call Old Ringers at the Ridgefield Theater Barn

Published on Thursday, 14 February 2019 14:37

Brewster’s Hamlet Hub

Written by Christine S. Bexley


Our protagonist is played to authentic perfection, down to the just-right Bronx accent and lilt of a seasoned day-drinker, by McGarry. Her throughline is natural no matter what wacky situations or daring costumes she is put into.


Diane (Frances McGarry) gets more than she expected when she answers the phone in Old Ringers, playing through February 23rd at The Ridgefield Theater Barn. Photo Credit Paulette Layton

In the words of George Michael, “Sex is natural, sex is good. Not everybody does it, but everybody should.” And some people find it lucrative to do it over an untraceable phone attached to a PayPal account in order to pay the electric bill.   Making its Connecticut debut, the Ridgefield Theater Barn’s first offering of its 53rd season, Old Ringers, by Joe Simonelli, finds women of (mostly) an advanced age in that very spot, to often absurd outcomes.    When Diane (Frances McGarry) finds her Social Security check drastically diminished, a wrong number to a sex hotline opens the door to an adventurous financial opportunity. Joined by her friends–the frisky Verna (Linda Seay), the trepidatious Kathy Ann (Stefanie Rosenberg), and the sensible Rose (Laurel Lettieri)–and her carefree boyfriend Harry (Mark Rubino), Diane and the group must navigate worldly challenges and personal discoveries while maintaining their sense of humor and avoiding the judgmental gaze of Diane’s pious daughter Amanda (Sarah J. Ahearn) and a roving Detective Rumson (Joshua Adelson).   The playwright defines these characters through, at times, heavy handed dialogue and slapstick-driven motivations, but the actors bring humanity and genuineness to such two-dimensional archetypes with guidance and adjustments from director Carol Dorn, who freshens the material a bit for the present era of technology, sex positivity, and elder visibility.  

Our protagonist is played to authentic perfection, down to the just-right Bronx accent and lilt of a seasoned day-drinker, by McGarry. Her throughline is natural no matter what wacky situations or daring costumes she is put into. McGarry is matched in energy and ease by Rubino as Harry (who has some fun costuming moments of his own).    You could not ask for a better trio of friends than Diane’s to join her on this romp. Verna’s cliche “tramp” label was navigated well without unnecessary over-sexualization by Seay (who somehow did not come off as intoxicated despite double fisting a flask and a screwdriver. Impressive.). Lettieri’s Rose emanated grace and maturity (and a convincing bum hip), especially when espousing the customary “old lady wisdom,” despite the actress being no senior citizen.   Simonelli’s characters have some clunky and immediate transitions to make, and the cast worked diligently to make them seamless. Rosenberg’s Kathy Ann telegraphed her coming out moment from her first line, however, her distinct voice and pacing shifts were necessary for her bombastic reveal and she thrilled audiences in the process. Ahearn’s Amanda had to do some equally difficult personality gymnastics with the introduction of Tony Rumson, a detective played by newcomer to the craft Adelson. Ahearn jockeyed between over-wrought, teetotaling Christian and relaxed, inebriated flirt with speeds to induce whiplash. Adelson’s depiction of Rumson was a bit of a paradox as the actor’s earnestness clashed with the character’s reported bravado. For an acting debut, he rose to the occasion.  

Indicated by the pre-show music, this world of women was raised on Diana Ross, Lesley Gore, and Sonny and Cher in the sexual revolution 60s, and came of age in the self-improvement 70s. That these ladies would be so hung up on the morality theories of others was a convenient if implausible plot device, and the use of the detective as the literal as well as figurative voice of the law fell flat. Someone needs to tell these folks to relax: as long as everyone’s over eighteen years old, phone sex hotlines are not illegal. Sorry Tony.   Setting the actual stage, kudos to set designer and builder Nick Kaye. The verisimilitude of the Bronx abode was not only impressive to behold, but grounded the farcical nature of the action in a world that could be realistically inhabited, and where the coffee was hot enough to see the steam from the last row. While the comedy benefits from the low-hanging fruit of scantily- (or comically)-clad seniors, costume designer Will Heese outfitted each character in garb that fit personalities and situations naturally and completely (although Kathy Ann could use a longer coat to support her character’s presented modesty, as her costume is still visible to the audience and cheats the reveal a little).  

This is a show to take advantage of RTB’s cabaret style seating. Bring your favorite noshes, libations, and snacks to marvel at the riotous and resolute journeys these seven characters take. This brassy offering is anything but subtle as it raises laughter the to the rafters from sold out audiences.    Old Ringers runs until February 23, 2019 at the Ridgefield Theater Barn, 37 Halpin Ln, Ridgefield, CT, 06877. Doors open one hour prior to curtain, which is 8PM evenings and 2PM matinees. Tickets are $35 for adults, and $28 for seniors, students and veterans, and available at ridgefieldtheaterbarn.org or by calling the box office at 203- 431-9850. For more information, email  info@RidgefieldTheaterBarn.org.

Recommended for mature audiences.

OLD RINGERS: a new comedy by Joe Simonelli

A Hilarious Comedy By Joe Simonelli

Directed by Carol Dorn

It’s Golden Girls meets Calendar Girls in this semi-sequel to Men Are Dogs where four senior women try to fight the shrinking economy and their shrinking pocketbooks by investigating alternative means or generating income.  A wrong number leads to interesting possibilities in this adult bawdy comedy. *Mature Audiences Only*

Theater Review: Theater Barn Cast Definitely Not Phoning It In by Elizabeth Young The Newtown Bee

“Frances McGarry is a brave scene stealer. A gifted comedic actor, she takes hold of her character and plays her at full tilt. “


February 1 ~ 23
Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm
Sunday February 10th & 17th at 2pm

Get Tickets

Cabaret Seating ~ Bring Food & Drink
Doors open one hour prior to curtain



Featuring:
Frances McGarry
Linda Seay
Laurel Lettieri
Stefanie Rosenberg
Sarah Ahearn
Mark Rubino
and Joshua Adelson

Producer Presentation: Agnes of God

 

A Presentation for Producers of John Pielmeier’s Agnes of God, will be performed on Saturday, May 19th at 4 pm at the John DeSotelle Theater 754 9th Avenue, 4th floor.

I will be performing the role of Dr. Martha Livingston with Angel Brice as Mother Superior and Alex Taylor as Agnes.

This powerful story could not be more urgently told than in today’s culture of intolerance and inequality.

 

 

In an effort to encourage #onemoreconversation  I am reaching out to women to consider producing this play as a means to raise awareness of the issues explored and exposed through the characters’ voices.

 

There will be a brief wine reception and meet-and-greet with the director, Cammeron Baits and the members of the cast.

To make reservations please contact cammerronb@gmail.com. Once your RSVP is received the name(s) will be added to a list as this is an invite-only presentation; any names not on the list will not be allowed in.

There are no obligations; please come to see the presentation and be reminded of its powerfully potent message.